Trieste Contemporanea november 2001 n.8
 
TARGETING THE MEDIA

back to  HomePage

back to  Index

by Paul Hartig

Which are the strategies of the European Union to promote the circulation of culture?

There are criteria involved but the main actors of the programs are the central European countries and the Balkan countries are not included in these programs so far. But speaking about this question of nation and nationality. For me whose task it is to mobilise co-operation among the 17 countries of Central-Eastern Europe in the field of art, what does this imply? Of course my partners are in the first place the governments, the ministries of Culture and they have either a clear cultural policy or they are struggling to find an orientation, in many cases they donít have an idea on how to promote national art but they all have a feeling that cultural expression and cultural identity are central elements of culture. That is to say that public administrations tend to emphasise the local cultural identity and of course the main idea is to take it out of the local, or regional or national sphere and break into an international or global scene. The means for that are relatively simple, be it the situation of the Biennale of Venezia or other international art shows which are part of a big commercial show, and we have to admit to that, and can gain international recognition to oneís own producers. Another way is to leave it in practical terms to the ingenuity and commercial talent of international galleries whether they are in New York or in Rome and to trust that these galleries will through their contacts with museums in the world make these artists internationally known and turn them into international symbols of a local art scene. If I think of myself as a manager it is inevitable that questions of tension arise. How can I orient public administrations in this regard? Do I have start from the local art scene or should I start from the internationally recognised models or representatives of the country concerned? These are central questions that come up when you have to manage the promotion of art at international level. There is a central role in all this for media, art meets the audience meets public relations meet media and cultural management cannot live without an intimate relationship with the media. The same is true also for art galleries and institutions. Therefore also in the international management for co-operation we have to be absolutely aware that a large part of it is linked to the media. With regards to the EU I believe that a central factor is the question of European integration. I personally would advise all the members of Central and Eastern Europe, the member countries of this region and their cultural administrations that the first aspect in facing the European situation is democratic legitimisation. Also in field of recognition of art and culture in general, the countries which face the challenges of integration through their own identity, need a democratic legitimisation. It is quite obvious that without this democratic legitimisation there is no peace, freedom and there is no future.

Ambassador Paul Hartig, Director of the Executive Secretariat of CEI (Central-European Initiative)
 
 

 

 
 
 
back to  HomePage
back to  Index